5 Signs That it's Time to Switch Pet Foods

 

Date: June 1st, 2015

Are you considering changing your pet's food?

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It was once thought that pets should be kept on the same food their entire lives. However, like their human counterparts, a pet's dietary needs change over their life due to factors such as:

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  • Life stage
  • Activity level
  • Overall health

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1. Flaky/Dull Coat 

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A diet lacking in essential fatty acids can result in poor skin and coat health. Many pet food brands are now formulated to promote skin and coat health - look for a diet containing both Omega-3 and Omega-6 fatty acids to give your pet's coat that shiny and bright look.

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2. Stomach Trouble

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Rumbly stomachs, loose stool and chronic flatulence could be the result of food intolerance or the quality of food you're feeding. Some pets simply don't tolerate certain diets or ingredients as well as other ones.

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Gastrointestinal upset is uncomfortable for your pet as well as an inconvenience for pet owners. If you notice an ongoing issue, contact your vet for potential solutions. Sometimes it may be as easy as switching to premium food or a sensitive stomach diet that's right for your pet.

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3. Weakness or Loss of Energy

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If your pet had recently undergone a stressful event, sickness or surgery, he may understandably be a little worn out. However, if you notice your pet is showing less energy without one of these incidents, it may be the diet to blame. "Diets with high levels of antioxidants can help boost the immune response to accelerate your dog's recovery and get them back on their feet in no time," says Dr. Jessica Vogelsang.

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If you notice your pet is suddenly acting weak and tired, always contact a veterinarian before changing diets.

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4. Big Belly

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This one's pretty easy to spot! "If your pet needs to lose a few inches, a diet specifically designated for weight loss will ensure that they still have the proper amount of essential nutrients, vitamins, and minerals while ingesting fewer calories," says Dr. Vogelsang. These diets take advantage of the latest research in pet weight management to ensure your dog is on their way to a healthier weight in no time.

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5. Senioritis

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Although it may vary by breed, most pets are considered middle-aged to senior by the time they reach 5-7 years old. As a pet ages, their nutrient requirements change. Senior diets are generally lower in calories, higher in fiber, and often contain age-specific supplements such as joint support (Glucosamine and Chondroitin) and antioxidants

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Sources: http://www.petmd.com/dog/centers/nutrition/slideshows/6-signs-time-to-change-pet-food 



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Thank you very much for sharing such a useful guide. My sweet little is facing the same issue. Now I will change her diet so that she feel relax.



dejesusdavid192 - September 9, 2015

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